pamphlet2019

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

ozarkchinquapin.com

ozarkchinquapininfo@gmail.com

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

OUR MISSION & WORK

Restore the Ozark chinquapin tree to its native range through research & cross-pollination to develop 100% pure seed with blight resistance 

Our native Ozark chestnut tree.

Pronounced: chink-a-pin

ozarkchinquapin.com

ozarkchinquapininfo@gmail.com

 

The Ozark chinquapin produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year and is a valuable food source for deer, turkey, bear, & squirrels. 

Photos from trail cameras at our research plot in Missouri

Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Manual cross-pollinization

Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Research

 

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Seed Distribution

Seed Distribution

Our native Ozark chestnut tree.

Pronounced: chink-a-pin

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

The rot-resistant wood was used for fence posts, railroad ties, and musical instruments.  

“The Ozark chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell.  Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off.  Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.

The Ozark chinquapin produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year and is a valuable food source for deer, turkey, bear, & squirrels. 

Photos of wildlife on our research plots

Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

$30 donation for annual membership

Each year we mail OCF members seed to plant on their own land & collaborate

Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

$30 donation for annual membership

Each year we mail OCF members seed to plant on their own land & collaborate

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Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

$30 donation for annual membership

“The Ozark chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell.  Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off.  Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

Join The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

$30 donation for annual membership

Each year w

Produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year, and is a prefered food source for deer, turkey, bear, and squirrels. 

The OCF was formed & launched an initiative to save the imperiled species.  We are an organization of outdoors-men and women dedicated to restoring these trees so they do not fade from the memory and landscape of the Ozarks forever.

For the last 10+ years the we’ve been working to restore a species of chestnut native to the Ozarks called the Ozark chinquapin (chink-a-pin) tree.  Theses trees are valuable both to people & wildlife &  without intervention, the trees would be completely wiped out by a fungal disease called chestnut blight (cryphonectria parasitica). The blight fungus kills the trees by attacking the vascular tissue in the trunk and kills it at the top. The fungus prevents them from growing very big. Over 10 years ago my father Steve Bost began looking all over the native range of this tree to see if he could find any survivors, and his hard work paid off because he found several rare surviving trees, showing natural levels of resistance to the blight. The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation was formed and an initiative was launched to begin the work we are doing today.  By hand-pollinating select trees we were able to cross the best genetic lines of our trees to produce trees with higher levels of resistance to the blight.  Each year we collect nuts from our research test plots where we have hundreds of trees growing, and we distribute those seed to members of the OCF.  Our members act as volunteers and plant their own plot of trees on their private land and we also collaborate with state, local, and federal agencies to reforest the Ozark chinquapin to its native range in forests and woodlands. We are an organization of outdoors-men and women dedicated to restoring these trees so they do not fade from the memory and landscape of the Ozarks forever.  
 
As our organization grows, we see new opportunities for us to expand our donor base and increase our visibility as a conservation group doing real boots on the ground work!  We need help telling our story and would like to be able to produce photos and videos that “speak for the trees” and capture the grass-roots nature of our foundation. This would put us on the radar of some key people that can help us get the funding we need for additional research and facilities. My vision is to have more professional photos of our field sites and also lab research as well as a video recording the testimony of Ozark natives in their 90’s talking about their memories of the trees. 

Our native Ozark chestnut tree.

Pronounced: chink-a-pin

The rot-resistant wood was used for fence posts, railroad ties, and musical instruments.  

98 year old Missouri native reflecting on the trees

Producing a large crop of sweet nuts each year, the Ozark chinquapin is an important species both to humans and wilife

What Happened to the Trees?

The trees survive by putting out root collar sprouts from old dead stumps, but eventually succum to the disease

The rot-resistant wood was used for fence posts, railroad ties, and musical instruments.  

After locating several large surviving trees showing greater levels of blight resistance

Photos from trail cameras at our research plot in Missouri

Ozark chinquapin trees produce a large crop of sweet nuts each year, and are a preferred food source for deer, turkey, bear, and squirrels. 

Photos from trail cameras at our research plot in Missouri

Ozark chinquapin produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year and is a valuable food source for deer, turkey, bear, & squirrels. 

Photos from trail cameras at our research plot in Missouri

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure blight-resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure blight-resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

The Ozark Chinquapin Tree

Our Native Ozark Chestnut

Ozark chinquapin are drought tolerant hardwood trees that once grew to heights of 65 ft tall & 2-3 ft. in diameter.  It inhabited the rocky upper sloapes of the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma, with occurances in Alabama, east

Native to the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma with small populations in other states.

Produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year, and is a prefered food source for deer, turkey, bear, and squirrels. 

Highly prized for its rot-resistant wood, it made excellent lumber for railroad ties, fence posts, and furniture. 

These trees are valuable both to humans and wildlife, and without intervention, this imperiled species would be wiped out by the fungal disease, chestnut blight. 

The fungus kills the trees by attacking the vascular tissue.  

By hand-pollinating select trees we were able to cross the best genetic lines of surviving Ozark chinquapin to produce trees with higher levels of resistance to the blight.

 

 

 

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure blight-resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

Ozark chinquapin are drought tolerant hardwood trees that once grew to heights of 65 ft tall & 2-3 ft. in diameter.  It inhabited the rocky upper sloaps of the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma, with occurances in Alabama, east Texas, Missississippi, and Louisiana.

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure-blight resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

The Ozark Chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell. Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off. Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

The Ozark Chinquapin Tree

Our Native Ozark Chestnut

Ozark chinquapin are drought tolerant hardwood trees that once grew to heights of 65 ft tall & 2-3 ft. in diameter.  It inhabited the rocky upper sloapes of the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma, with occurances in Alabama, east

Native to the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma with small populations in other states.

Produces a large crop of sweet nuts each year, and is a prefered food source for deer, turkey, bear, and squirrels. 

Highly prized for its rot-resistant wood, it made excellent lumber for railroad ties, fence posts, and furniture. 

These trees are valuable both to humans and wildlife, and without intervention, this imperiled species would be wiped out by the fungal disease, chestnut blight. 

The fungus kills the trees by attacking the vascular tissue.  

By hand-pollinating select trees we were able to cross the best genetic lines of surviving Ozark chinquapin to produce trees with higher levels of resistance to the blight.

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure blight-resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

Ozark chinquapin are drought tolerant hardwood trees that once grew to heights of 65 ft tall & 2-3 ft. in diameter.  It inhabited the rocky upper sloaps of the Ozarks in Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma, with occurances in Alabama, east Texas, Missississippi, and Louisiana.

Produces a large reliable crop of nuts each year, and is a prefered food source of deer, turkey, bear & squirells. 

catkin.canopy.1.z

The Ozark chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell. Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off. Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

Through cross-pollination and research, we are working to establish 100% pure-blight resistant Ozark chinquapin that can reproduce and thrive in our forests. 

The Ozark Chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell. Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off. Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Saving an American Treasure

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

The Ozark Chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell. Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off. Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

the Ozark

Chinquapin Foundation

the Ozark

Chinquapin Foundation

the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

Saving an American Treasure

The Ozark Chinquapin nuts were delicious and we waited for them to fall like you would wait on a crop of corn to ripen, they were that important. Up on the hilltop the nuts were so plentiful that we scooped them up with flat blade shovels and loaded them into the wagons to be used as livestock feed, to eat for ourselves, and to sell. Deer, bears, turkeys, squirrels, and a variety of other wildlife fattened up on the sweet crop of nuts that fell every year. But, starting in the 1950’s and 60′s all of the trees started dying off. Now they are all gone and no one has heard of them.”

Saving an American Treasure

the Ozark

Chinquapin Foundation

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Ozark Chinquapin Hunting

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