Mixed 20% sand with sifterd soil so as not to damage the seed roots

OVERVIEW

We are working to establish a viable seed base through research and cross-pollination of blight resistant trees to develop 100% pure Ozark Chinquapin that can produce and thrive in our forests. Our efforts involve:

  • locating blight resistant trees 
  • distribute resistance seed for growing
  • cross pollination
  • DNA Analysis to confirm pure native strands
  • nut grafting/twig grafting
  • establishing research farms  

This restoration  work  is a collaborative effort involving  University researchers, student volunteers, local, State, and Federal cooperators, as well as  outdoors-men and women participating in field research and education.  

Al Knox explaining how to handle the fragile Ozark Chinquapin seed to volunteers at Hobbs State Park